Horn attachment for string musical instruments

Abstract

Claims

July 14, 1931. J WEN 1,814,767 HORN ATTACHMENT FOR STRING MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS Filed Dec. 14, 1929 fair. E J6 fJIE- 7 I INVENTOR. -. I .az J6 U556 1 P954 Patented July 14, 1931 PATENT OFFICE JOSE MA PENA, or 'I'AMPICO, MEXICO HORN ATTACHMENT FOR STRING MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS Application filed December 14, 1929. Serial No. 414,011. This invention relates to new and useful improvements in. ahorn attachment for a string musical instrument. The invention has for an object the provi- 5 sion of a device of the class mentioned which is of simple durable construction, dependable in use and efiicient in action, and which can be manufactured and sold at a reasonable cost. ' The invent-ion proposes the use of a horn, means for attaching said horn on a string musical instrument, a needle operated diaphragm sound box on the inner end of the horn, and means for vibrating the needle according to the vibrations of the sound board of the string musical instrument. For further comprehension of the invention, and of the objects and advantages thereof, reference will be had to the following description and accompanying drawings, and to the appended claims in which the various novel features of the invention are more particularly set forth. In the accompanying drawings forming a material part of this disclosure Fig. 1 is a perspective View of a horn attachment constructed according to this in vention applied upon a violin. Fig. 2 is a plan view of the horn, per se, shown in Fig. 1. Fig. 3 is a fragmentary enlarged sectional View taken on the line 3-3 of Fig. 1. Fig. 4: is a plan view of the vibration plug used with the attachment, a portion being broken away to disclose interior parts. Fig. 5 is a fragmentary sectional View taken on the line 55 of Fig. 1. Fig. 6 is a fragmentary sectional view taken on the line 6-6 of Fig. 5. Fig. 7 is a fragmentary plan view looking in the direction of the arrows 77 of Fig. 5. Fig. 8 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view similar to a portion of Fig. 4:, but illustrating a modification. The horn attachment for a string musical instrument consists of a horn 10, a means 11 for attaching the said horn upon a string instrument such as 12, a needle operated diaphragm sound box 13 on the inner end of the horn, and means for vibrating the needle according to the vibrations of the sound board of the string instrument. Numeral 15 indicates the sound board of the violin. The said horn 10 is of conventional fashion. The horn is of bent form so as to reduce its overall size and at its inner end 16 is of similar diameter and gradually increases to its outer end which is provided with a flared portion 17 The said means for attaching the horn 10 upon the violin 12 consists of a support member 18 having a tubular portion encircling a portion of the horn and having parallel ends 19 engaging the top and bottom of the body of the violin. A U shaped clamp 20 is arranged for securing the ends 19 against displacement. This clamp has a movable jaw 21 slidably arranged by projecting pegs 22 and operable by a screw 23 having a handle The string instrument shown which is a violin is provided with a bridge 25 vertically arranged upon the sound board 15. The strings 26 of the instrument pass over this bridge as is customary. The sound box 13 is of conventional design such as used on phonographs differing only in that it has a needle 27 of exceptional length. This needle engages into a vibration bridge 28 preferably of tortoise shell and positioned slightly to the front of the bridge 25 and resting upon the strings 26. A vibration wire 29 is attached upon the vibration bridge 28 and is engaged thru the jaw 30 of a vibration controller 14. The vibration controller 14 consists of a barrel 31 supporting the said jaw 30 and connected with a transverse sound board 32. The sound board 32 is arranged upon the violin board 15 and is mounted beneath the bridge 25 as shown in Fig. 5. The barrel :31 is disposed on one side of the bridge 25. A vibration adjuster 33 is slidably engaged in the barrel 31 and overhangs from the barrel. An adjustment screw 38 engages thru the adjuster 33 and threadedly connects with a lug 39 integral with the jaw element 30. In Fig. 8 a modified form of plug has been illustrated which has a barrel portion 31 integral with the jaw 30 and vibration adjuster 33 slidably mounted on the barrel. The vibration adjuster is formed with slots 3% engaged by tongues 35 from the barrel 31 for limiting the amplitude of possible overhanging. A screw 36 engages thru the adjuster 33 and threadedly engages in the barrel 31. A set screw 37 engages in the adjuster 33 and secures the adjuster upon the screw 36. In operation of the device, it is engaged in place as shown in Fig. 1. hen the violin is played, the strings vibrate and the sound board 15 correspondingly vibrates; These vibrations are transmitted to the needle of the sound box 13 and then thru the horn which serves as an amplifier. The tone or quality of the music may be changed by rotating the screw 38 for changing the over hang of: the adjuster 33. The operation oi the vil ration adjuster 33 changes the shape of the vibrating parts. It is a well known fact that it the shape of a vibrating body is changed, the overtones produced by that body are changed. The intensity of the overtones are changed, while some are com pletely lost and others added. The quality of a tone or note is determined merely by the presence, absence and intensity of overtones. Since the vibration controller 33 controls the presence, absence and intensity of the overtones, it therefore also controls the quality or tone of the notes. Vibrations from the sound board 15 communicate with the sound board 32, with the barrel 31, the jaw 30, and the vibration wire 29. The vibrations then continue to the vibration bridge 28 and finally to the needle 27. Vibrations from the strings 26 are also communicated with the vibration bridge 28. A change in the overhang of the adjuster 33 eii ects the vibrations and changes the tone of the music. Vibrations, when strings are played, go thru to the vibration bridge, from this to the needle, then to the sound box and next to the horn. This principle produces great volumes of sound. Vibrations, when the strings are played, go thru to the vibration bridge, from this to the vibration string 29, then to the vibration controller, from the controller to the barrel 31 and boards 32. Under this point, vibrations from bridge 25 are oined and go thru to the acoustic box 13. lhus soundings of horn and violin are com bined. lVhile 1 have shown and described the preferred embodiment of my invention, it is to be understood that I do not limit myself to the precise construction herein disclosed and the right is reserved to all changes'and modifications coming within. the scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims. Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new, and desire to secure by United States Letters Patent is 1. In a device of the class described, a tubular barrel open at one end and closed at the other end for attachment to the soundboard of a violin, a U shaped jaw on the closed end of the barrel for receiving vibrations, a vibration adjuster slidably engaged within and projecting out of the barrel for adjusting the quality of music from the violin, and means for moving said slidable vibration adjuster. 2. In adevice of the class described, a tubular barrel open at one end and closed at the other end for attachment to the soundboard of a violin, U shaped jaw 011 the closed end of the barrel for receiving vibrations, a vibration adjuster slidably engaged within and projecting out of the barrel for adjusting the quality of music from the violin, and means for moving said slidable vibration adjuster, comprising a lug formed-'1 with threads on the closed and inner end of the barrel, and an adjustment screw through the vibration adjuster engaging with the threads of the said lugs. In testimony whereof I have affixed my signature. JOSE MA Pena.

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Cited By (2)

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    US-2014366703-A1December 18, 2014Sankarasubrahmani Uday ShankarContinuous pitch wind musical instrument and a composite string instrument and continuous pitch wind musical instrument
    US-9412343-B2August 09, 2016Sankarasubrahmani Uday ShankarContinuous pitch wind musical instrument and a composite string instrument and continuous pitch wind musical instrument